Make them earn their Check…a dressage blog

Promise this is the last previous dressage blog I will run- please feel free to comment on any of the posts! that’s my favorite part- generally the comments are better than my posts!

LighthorseDarkhorse Compendium

Reading the responses and postings from adult amateur riders compels me to address a common misunderstanding between instructor and instructee.  In a fellow blogger’s comment section I referenced the different psyches involved with teaching teenagers and teaching adults. (see comments)  This generated some discussion on why adults may have specific concerns.  Alas,  I too am an adult and have indeed suffered injuries from riding.  I however, seem to believe more in some adults than they believe in themselves.  This is usually illustrated when we first meet and are setting long-term goals.  Almost invariably if I ask a teenager what they would like to accomplish they say “I want to ride in the Olympics.”  Lofty goals indeed.  We then discuss what kind of dedication is involved in reaching that kind of commitment.  When I ask an adult with seemingly the same ambition and enthusiasm the identical question I usually get a somewhat…

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Horses are Welcome too!!

Me and Sam in England ’75
Me and Sammy in Germany ’79. Ponies make great teachers!

Saturday promises to be exciting as I am spending the day with some of my best friends, Ponies!   The Atlanta Pony Club is meeting me at Foxberry Farms in Dallas, Georgia for a full day of dressage lessons.

This is not my first time teaching the ponyclubbers and I hope I will be invited again.  Having started riding in England I had a short brush with the

British Pony Club and have a great deal of respect for the organization.  Any rider that has earned the rating of “A” ponyclubber is not only qualified to be a professional rider but has proven to be an expert in horse and barn management as well.  To check how you measure up click here for the United State’s Pony Club’s  Standards of Proficiency for H-B, HH-A Levels (the horse management section of the “A” level).  The Dressage Specialty Riding Test is no walk in the park either!

As riders “rate” through the system, starting with the fundamentals of horsecare and riding, they prove their skills through testings.  These are no easy tests!  Safety and the integrity of the ratings are a priority and much preparation, instruction and hard work goes into preparing the riders for their ratings.  Rallies are held for concentrated coaching before rating sessions and the ponyclubbers must work together with a team in all areas of barn management.  To make sure the kids are focused and learning the information themselves, parents are not allowed in the barn area at rallies.

Don’t get the idea that Ponyclub is all work and testing!  Ponyclubbers learn while having  fun!  Jumping, gymkhana, eventing, foxhunting, all types of English riding opportunities abound, both at the local and national level. Scholarships are even available for hard-working applicants.  If you are a young rider or if you have a young rider in the family I strongly recommend Ponyclub for a well-rounded horseman’s education.  It’s a well-known fact, no one can teach you more than a pony!

United States Pony Club

Atlanta Pony Club

It’s About Time….

“If your early you’re on time, if you’re on time you’re late, if you’re late you’re left behind.”

A successful competitor prepares ahead for the next exercise!

Despite the less-than-cooperative weather we’ve encountered this winter the competition season is upon us.  Time to start navigating through the tests and working out the geometry of the arena.  Just the mention of test riding has a paralyzing effect on many riders.  It may be more productive and less fear inducing to think of it as a demonstration of your training rather than a “test”.

A ride in front of a judge, (as well as at home for that matter) should always demonstrate the rider’s understanding that maintaining and/or improving the horse’s natural gaits are the top priority.  A quality transition ridden a stride late is more acceptable than an abrupt, unbalanced transition ridden precisely at the marker.  While riding the diagrams accurately is always important, the test is designed to demonstrate that the rider has an understanding of the correct fundamentals of the level being shown.  Of course, an accurately ridden figure is ideal, but never sacrifice the balance!

Preparation for each movement is the responsibility of the rider.  This is what the corners of the arena are made for!   There are two opportunities (corners) before each movement to make sure that the horse is forward, engaged and on the rider’s aids.  The set-up for the next exercise should be done in the corner before it is performed.  If the rider fails to utilize the corners to adequately prepare the horse, resulting in a movement that is marred by a loss of rhythm or balance, the price will be paid in the rider’s collective marks.

Several times before the show, have someone videotape your test ride.  It is not uncommon to feel that the horse is clipping along in a forward fashion, only to see the ride on a video later and realize it was actually painfully sluggish.  The opposite is also true, I have ridden many tests that I thought were nice and steady only to see them on video and realize I was rushing the horse off his feet.  Ride the rhythm of the gait and work the exercises around it.

In the end, nobody, including the judge, is expecting perfection from your horse.  The show is designed to demonstrate that your training is progressing correctly to continue through the levels.  Ride your horse proudly and be forgiving if he is less than perfect.  Even if there are errors in your ride, a tactful rider that is grateful for the ride is a winner in any good horseman’s eyes every time.